Optical dating of sediments honeymoon dating

The recombination generates the emission of light (the luminescence signal) which can be measured in laboratory through heating (for TL) or through light stimulation for OSL (Huntley ., 1985).The intensity of the signal is proportional to the amount of released electrons.They are now largely used to date not only palaeontological or organic remains, but also minerals that characterise detrital clastic sedimentary material.The most common methods applied to minerals are cosmogenic radionuclides, electron spin resonance (ESR) and luminescence techniques.

Released electrons can recombine with another kind of crystalline defects (“holes” reflecting electrons vacancies).

These “deep traps” (stable traps associated with high energy levels) can adequately be used for dating.

The total amount of trapped electrons within a crystal is proportional to the total energy absorbed and retained by the crystal (or dose), hence the time it was exposed to radiation.

This phenomenon is associated with a resetting (“zeroing”) of the dosimetric clock; iii) after one or several transport phases the grain is “definitively” buried under a sedimentary cover.

It is exposed again to radiation and accumulates trapped electrons.

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